Q&A / 

Clearing land for a house can be expensive. If you are doing your own site clearing, be sure to use all the proper safety equipment. Check with a tree service in case you have high-price timber.

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Excavating a new home lot must be carefully planned. Foundation holes have to be the proper depth and not too big. Your site excavation plans needs to consider sidewalks, driveways and the trees you want to save.

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Purchasing a chainsaw can be overwhelming. Chainsaws come in a variety of sizes and horsepower. Select a chainsaw with a chainsaw bar long enough for your cutting needs.

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Tim Carter demonstrates one method for removing stumps. This method is especially effective if you have many stumps to remove in a short amount of time.

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Clearing land to build a new home may not be a do-it-yourself project. Land clearing can involve heavy land clearing equipment, depending on the size of the construction project. You might start with some simple hand tools, an industrial grade chainsaw and end up with a bulldozer.

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Tim Carter demonstrates easy ways to level a yard, make a drench or dig a hole with a rototiller or power tiller. A garden tiller works wonders on getting that soil ready to plant.

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Topographic maps will tell you a lot about a lot. The spacing of the topographic lines will indicate any hills or valleys on that piece of property. Topography will aid in spotting streams or storm water retention basins on the lot before you purchase it.

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A soil map is one of the most important resources you can have when building a home. Tim Carter discusses why you should use soil maps, and how one can be used to build a better home.

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