Q&A / 

Garage Door Maintenance

Springs

Probably the most important part of a garage door are the springs. These beasts are the muscles that are actually supposed to do 95 percent of all the work to lift an overhead garage door. If you have to struggle to lift your door, then the springs are out of adjustment or possible worn out. You can check your springs fairly easily. If the door is well lubricated and the door is not in a bind within the tracks, it should stay suspended in a halfway open or closed position. If it opens, the springs might be too tight. If the door proceeds to close on its own and slams to the ground, the springs are too loose or worn out.

Do NOT attempt to adjust the springs yourself. It is very dangerous and must only be done by a trained professional.

Cables, Levers, Hinges, Rollers, etc.

Every six months, take a look at the hardware parts that make up the garage door. Look for worn metal, loose connections, etc. If you spot them, call a professional. Every year, homeowners get seriously injured when they fiddle around with garage door hardware. Some crazy homeowners who paint their doors try to remove hardware to paint behind it. More than one homeowner has been KILLED when they removed the bottom bracket that is attached to the cables or springs!

Remember, when a garage door is down in the closed position, the springs are like cocked guns. The springs are loaded with hundreds of pounds of potential energy just waiting to be released. If you unbolt a nut and the spring rips the bracket from your door, it can take your head with it. I have witnessed springs that have failed and shot across a garage like a cannon ball. Don't mess with the hardware. Leave it to a pro!

For further information on garage door safety and maintenance, go to the web site of the International Door Association (www.door.org) and read their article on "Automatic Garage Door Opener and Garage Door Safety & Maintenance Guide."

Periodic Lubrication

You can lubricate your door's moving parts. Always use a lightweight oil to coat the rollers, hinge pins, track, etc. Never use a heavy oil or grease.

 

 

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