Q&A / 

Glass Block Video

In the past, working with glass block was the same as working with bricks. You had to use mortar for the glass block installation. Now, there are simple plastic spacers to perfectly align the glass blocks. Short spacers for side to side spacing and a longer space for spacing between rows. No messy wet mortar. You use silicon caulk. When it cures, it is very hard.

The glass block must sit on a solid base, either wood, metal or concrete. After placing the first block, be sure to check that it is level and plumb. Apply some silicon caulk and install the first vertical spacer to the side of the block. Continue this as you place the glass blocks across the row.

To keep the glass block from tilting over, use a special hidden anchor. This anchor inserts into the plastic horizontal spacer and screws into the side frame. This will hold the spacer in place for the next row.

Use these blocks to easily make a great glass block window, glass block shower enclosure, interior green house, or whatever project you can image. Installing glass block is much easier with this new spacer system.

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5 Responses to Glass Block Video

  1. As you can probably guess, I already knew that.
    Here's one for you....man made stone (not the typical mortar set thin veneer but the full sized units) made with cement and silica should be set with spacers, anchored to the wall at each course with a tie that engages a "slot" in the unit, and then the head and bed joints filled with a backer rod and sealant.** (Notice I said sealant. Caulk fills a space, a sealant seals a space because of its' elastomeric properties. Silicone sealants have the longest service life for this application.) This method will perform long term and overcome inevitable shrinkage that is a characteristic of cement based products.

    **An alternate method would be to set the units in mortar, rake the joint 1/2 as deep as the dimension of the mortar joint i.e. a 3/8" mortar joint would be raked to a 3/16" depth. This would be in line with most sealant manufacturers recommendation of a 2:1 width to depth ratio for a sealant but not deeper than 1/4". Then install a bond breaking vinyl tape to cover the face of the raked mortar (bond breaker tapes are available in various widths just like backer rod) and then apply the sealant, of course tooling/striking it concave.

    As always, your friend Mike Collins

  2. TIM, DO YOU KNOW HOW I CAN INSTALL TWO SLIDING DOORS IN A SPACE OF 78 IN BY 78 IN I KNOW HOW TO DO THE WITH BUT SINCE OF ALL DOORS ARE 80 IN HIGH I NEED ONE 77IN HIGH AND THEY ARE HOLLOW. THANKS. LOVE YOUR WEB SITE . LARRY

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