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Buy the Best Acrylic Latex Paint and Primer

100 Percent Acrylic Latex House Paints and Compatible Primers

Just below is a LINK that will take you to a list of 10 manufacturers of 100 percent acrylic exterior house paints. Be aware that the manufacturers introduce new products with different names on a constant basis. For example, Sherwin Williams came out with a paint called Duration on or about 2005. Then around 2013 they introduced another new acrylic paint called Emerald.

All manufacturers make a compatible primer. These are the paints you must get for a superior painting experience. Do not accept substitutes! Beware of paints that simply state "acrylic" paint on the label. Did you know that a manufacturer can put a small amount of acrylic resin in the paint and then add additional vinyl acetate or other lesser quality resins and STILL call the paint an "Acrylic Paint"? You have to be careful out there!

Some new paints say they don't require a primer. As far as I'm concerned about this claim, the jury is still out.

Pricing is always a great barometer. Acrylic resin is the most expensive ingredient (by quantity) in paint. It can cost up to twice as much as vinyl acetate resins. This means that a 100 percent acrylic resin house paint can have maybe several dollars more worth of basic ingredients.

These costs must be passed on to you. You can bet that a 100 percent acrylic house paint will be one of the most expensive paints in the store. Thus, if you see "bargain" house paint for $8 to $10 per gallon, resist the temptation! It probably has a so-so vinyl acetate resin that's not that good.

You can get good buys on the best paint. Watch for sales. The spring and early fall are times to watch for paint sales.

CLICK HERE for the link to the top manufacturers.

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8 Responses to Buy the Best Acrylic Latex Paint and Primer

  1. Also, your building specs that I bought from you says that the finish paint must be acrylic-urethane resin paint, is that the same thing as saying 100% Acrylic? If not, which is better for exterior paint?

  2. I clicked SHOP and enters a couple different search criteria but never found the manufacturers of 100% acrylic paint.

  3. that is because the author planned for the short-term post. very poor practice in terms of online blogging etiquette. you are coming in four years after the original post (as am i) and this dude will likely never return to answer questions or comments. i simply add blogs like this to my list of blocked websites for future searches.

    • Dear Kevin:

      I do answer some comments.This particular post was originally one giant page and I decided to split it in parts. That's why you feel it may not have all you want in one place. Simply use my search engine here and enter in keywords and keyword phrases to locate what you need.

      It's a shame that you'd blacklist a site that's got information created by someone who's actually worked in paying customers' homes for decades. Most of my peers out there with similar sites have day jobs and have NEVER been on a real job site. Just go read their About page to verify that statement.

  4. Thanks for the reply. I also work in homes for a living. That's why when I read the,(yes older post) I was put off by what looked to me like a brush off of the question...OK pun intended. I believe we are all here to help each other in whatever capicity we can; so the "not getting paid to name a product " statement kinda ticked me off.
    I'm always looking for new/ better ways to help people and how I approach my work. I was looking to compare ceramic vs stearate and others for washability. That's when I clicked on the site. I didn't backlist the site, I just felt the need to respond , reactionary as it may have been.

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