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Quick Column Summary: Tar paper or 6 mil plastic vapor barrier Leave an air gap to avoid mold Video link Charles Gregoire is perplexed up in Ottawa, the capital of Canada. "Confusion on whether to use tar paper or 6 mil plastic. In repairing a 64" section of an existing basement interior wood framed dry […]

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Tom Donohue, who lives up in Ontario, Canada, has a humid basement. He's not alone. Millions have this issue. "How can I reduce humidity in my basement in the summer. I do not have cracks in my foundation or sitting water. The humidity level today is handled with a de-humidifier. Is there a better long […]

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Missy Merritt, who lives in Ocean View, NJ, has a problem in her pool house. " I have a pool house that was build without a foundation. You have to step down to the pool house. This is my only guest room and it is very musty smelling. The pump from the well is in a […]

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Ruth Hendrickson, who lives in Lincoln, MA wrote to me with a very fascinating question: "My wood frame house built in 1927 has wood shingles outside and plaster over rock lath inside. No wall insulation. Probably balloon construction. Is it safe to put insulation in the walls, or will I get water vapor condensing in […]

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Janice Rozier, who lives in Folkston, GA, sent me a fascinating email: "I'm having an addition built onto my existing brick home. The question I have is about the house wrap vs vapor barrier. The addition is framed wood structure with cement siding, (already installed), cathedral ceiling, and concrete floor. Do I need the vapor […]

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With fall in the air, the weather can get colder and wetter. You need to consider how to protect your home construction building materials from the elements. Manufactured housing options can save time when doing home construction late in the building season.

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Condensation problems in the garage could be from melted snow, a propane heater or a vapor barrier in the wrong place. Moisture problems are caused by too much humidity. A ceiling vapor barrier can trap moisture and create condensation.

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Frost in walls can form when temperatures drop well below zero. This interior wall frost is condensation from the water vapor held in the warm air inside your house. What can be done to reduce interior frost?

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Many homeowners experience window condensation in the winter. Condensation can form on windows, walls, ceilings, the underside of roofs, and more places. Condensation on windows comes from the water vapor inside your home. Homes that are sealed-up, so they are more energy efficient, can produce condensation on windows.

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Controlling indoor humidity will help condensation in the form of frosting on inside walls and dripping windows. Check your indoor humidity with a hygrometer. Learn how does a hygrometer work, then follow these tips on controlling indoor humidity and window condensation.

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